Social Science Students at USF Statistics Project

Description

I will attach the instructions and rubric and one example of how the paper should look like. I will attach the other files you need as well. Please follow the instructions and the rubric carefully.

You can find the SPSS files in this link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1gr3-5m3SVY…

Step 2 – Example Note: The graphs and charts used in this example are for illustration purposes only, and do not necessarily correspond to the (hypothetical) descriptive statistics presented below. Three graphs are shown in this example; your submission should contain nine (9) in total. 1. local.sav “example” “classrank” “finscore” (nominal) (ordinal) (scale) gss2016.sav “example” “classrank” “finscore” (nominal) (ordinal) (scale) issp2016.sav “example” “classrank” “finscore” (nominal) (ordinal) (scale) 2. local.sav “example” mode: No “classrank” median: Sophomore range: Freshman – Senior “finscore” mean: 83.63 standard deviation: 4.41 gss2016.sav “example” mode: Yes “classrank” median: Junior range: Freshman – Senior “finscore” mean: 84.51 standard deviation: 4.23 issp2016.sav “example” mode: Yes “classrank” median: Junior range: Freshman – Senior “finscore” mean: 88.09 standard deviation: 2.29 3. local.sav gss2016.sav [three (3) graphs or charts, with data labels shown here] issp2016.sav [three (3) graphs or charts, with data labels shown here]

4. My nominal-level variables measured whether or not students were provided an example, and the local data indicated that the modal (i.e., most common) response to that question was “No.” This differed from the national and global data, where respondents most frequently indicated that they were provided an example (Mode = “Yes”). Respondents’ “classrank” ranged from Freshman to Senior across all three data files, but the median “classrank” in the local data (Sophomore) differed from the median in the national (Junior) and global (Senior) data. Finally, while the mean and standard deviation were relatively similar in the local (Mean = 83.63, Standard Deviation = 4.41) and national (Mean = 84.51, Standard Deviation = 4.23) data, the mean was noticeably higher in the global data (Mean = 88.09).

In addition, the smaller standard deviation in the global data (2.29) indicates that global respondents’ “finscore” does not vary as much as local or national respondents. You will turn in a document (in MS Word or pdf format) that addresses each of the requirements listed below. SUMMARY Step 2 is designed to get you thinking about how to analyze your chosen topic at the local, national, and global levels–specifically, by comparing a sample consisting of Social Science Statistics students at USF, a sample of (English-speaking, noninstitutionalized) Americans, and a cross-national sample consisting of data about Americans as well as a number of other nations.

From each of the samples mentioned above, you will choose three variables (i.e., nine variables in total). All variables should somehow fit into a theme that would be useful for a social science research project on your topic. For each variable, report appropriate measures of central tendency (and dispersion, if applicable), and an appropriate graph with data labels displayed. Summarize your findings in complete sentences. REQUIREMENTS 1. Choose three (3) variables from the local.sav file, three (3) variables from the gss2016.sav file, and three (3) variables from the issp2016.sav file (i.e., a total of 9 variables) that relate to your topic. While you should definitely include one demographic variable (i.e., age, sex, income, religion, etc.), others should be “topical” variables-variables that (more or less) directly relate to your issue. Each set of three variables that you choose must contain one variable measured at the nominal level, one at the ordinal level, and one at the scale level of measurement. In total, you should have: • • • three (3) variables measured at the nominal level three (3) variables measured at the ordinal level three (3)

variables measured at the scale level Note: You may choose the same three variables across all three data files download, if this possibility presents itself. In fact, this strategy often makes for the best kinds of comparisons. If you cannot find variables that match across all three data files, just do your best to find comparable variables (i.e., variables that measure the same thing, even if they don’t do it in exactly the same way). You may find that you need to adjust your topic a bit based on the variables that are available in the three data files. If you are unsure about what levels of measurement are, please review Chapter 2. 2. For each variable, report appropriate measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable). Note: Review Chapter 5 of your textbook for information on which measures of central tendency and dispersion are most appropriate given the characteristics of your variables. You do not need to include the “Statistics” table or frequency distribution output in your submission, but you will not be penalized if you do.

3. For each variable, provide SPSS output showing an appropriate chart or graph. Your chart or graph must also display “data labels.” Note: Review Chapter 6 of your textbook for information on which chart or graph is most appropriate given the characteristics of your variable, as well as how to show data labels in SPSS charts and graphs. 4. Summarize your findings across all three samples in at least 4-6 complete sentences. Do the descriptive statistics (measures of central tendency and dispersion) and visual representations of data (graphs) that you produced look roughly the same, or do noteworthy differences exist as you compare your issue at the local, national, and global level? Be sure to cite the statistics you produced in your 4-6 sentence summary. Note: Your textbook contains “Writing Boxes” (see, for example, pp. 62-63) that can give you some helpful hints about how to write up the results of your statistical analyses.

ASSESSMENT Nine (9) variables with levels of measurement correctly indicated — for each set of three: 1 nominal, 1 ordinal, 1 scale (9 POINTS) Appropriate measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable) reported (18 POINTS) SPSS Output: Appropriate charts or graphs with data labels shown (18 POINTS) Summary of findings — At least 4-6 complete sentences comparing local, national, and global statistics and graphs (5 POINTS) Step 2 Rubric Criteria Ratings Pts 9 pts Full Marks Variables Nine (9) variables with levels of measurement correctly indicated — for each set of three: 1 nominal, 1 ordinal, 1 scale 7 pts Average Three variables from each data file are chosen, but some variables do not meet level of measurement requirement. 5 pts Unsatisfactory Less than nine variables are chosen, or many variables do not meet level of measurement requirement. O pts No Marks No variables chosen.

Three variables from each data file are chosen, and each set of three variables contains one nominal-, one ordinal-, and one scale-level variable. 9 pts 14 pts Average Measures Appropriate measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable) reported 18 pts Full Marks Appropriate measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable) reported for all variables. 10 pts Unsatisfactory Many measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable) reported are not appropriate, or some measures are missing altogether. O pts No Marks No measures reported. Appropriate measures of central tendency (and measures of dispersion, if applicable) reported for most variables. 18 pts Charts or Graphs SPSS Output: Appropriate charts or graphs with data labels shown O pts No Marks 18 pts Full Marks SPSS Output displayed which shows appropriate charts or graphs with data labels for all variables.

14 pts Average SPSS Output displayed which shows appropriate charts or graphs with data labels for most variables OR appropriate charts or graphs are displayed but no data labels are displayed in any charts or graphs. 10 pts Unsatisfactory SPSS Output displayed which shows many inappropriate charts or graphs, or some charts or graphs are missing altogether No charts or graphs displayed. 18 pts O pts No Marks Summary At least 4-6 complete sentences comparing local, national, and global statistics and graphs 5 pts Full Marks At least 4-6 complete sentences comparing local, national, and global statistics and graphs 3.75 pts Average Comparison of local, national, and global statistics and graphs is less than 4-6 complete sentences OR comparison of statistics and graphs suffers from significant shortcomings. 3 pts Unsatisfactory Comparison of local, national, and global statistics and graphs is less than 4-6 complete sentences AND comparison of statistics and graphs suffers from significant shortcomings. No summary and comparisons provided. 5 pts Total Points: 50

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